The Dark Lord: H.P. Lovecraft, Kenneth Grant, and the Typhonian Tradition in Magic

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Dark Lord: H.P. Lovecraft, Kenneth Grant, and the Typhonian Tradition in Magic file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Dark Lord: H.P. Lovecraft, Kenneth Grant, and the Typhonian Tradition in Magic book. Happy reading The Dark Lord: H.P. Lovecraft, Kenneth Grant, and the Typhonian Tradition in Magic Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Dark Lord: H.P. Lovecraft, Kenneth Grant, and the Typhonian Tradition in Magic at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Dark Lord: H.P. Lovecraft, Kenneth Grant, and the Typhonian Tradition in Magic Pocket Guide.

This is what I got throughout the whole book. This is not an exhaustive study on the Typhonian Tradition is that even possible one might ask? Levenda also knows how to give us the creepers when discussing the incursions from the Trans-Plutonian and how this relates to the Typhonian tradition. Again, he desires us to look further and do our own homework on the subject, but firstly giving us the toolkit to connect more and more dots. Levenda also makes a good case for the often heavily critiqued, mostly among post-colonial scholars, bricolage-tendency in western spirituality.


  • The Dark Lord: H.P. Lovecraft, Kenneth Grant, and the Typhonian Tradition in Magic by Peter Levenda;
  • Time Series : Modeling, Computation, and Inference.
  • Shop now and earn 2 points per $1.
  • Tomato Plant Culture In the Field, Greenhouse, and Home Garden.
  • Geology of the Central Transantarctic Mountains;
  • Distributed Event-Based Systems!

Bertiaux's voudon gnosis is one of the latest to receive some backlash over the fact that his system has little to do with 'authentic' voudon. Levenda argues, and correctly, that historical and anthropological correctness have little function in magick. In fact, post-colonial theory forgets that this is how the occult works, worldwide, and not just in the occident. This carelesness is exactly what characterizes the Dark Lord himself. A total disregard for theology or doctrinal consistency, but a feverish search for techniques with empirically verifiable results of terrifying magnitude yes, terrifying.

Occultism and purism are anathema to one another. Occultism is soley concerned with results, whatever the cost, literally and figuratively, even if it means hanging one's life in the balance.

The Dark Lord - The Hermetic Library Blog

So much so that Crowley would have loved the emergence of pastiche esotericism in our post-modern times as it would further prove his case that the New Aeon of the Crowned and Conquering Child is indeed upon us. That we rebel against the parental Aeons of Isis and Osiris without fully cutting the roots, but defining ourselves individually in relation to it. Lastly, Levenda offers a short but interesting appendix on the "kalas", a subject Kenneth Grant often deals with in his trilogies, but never really extended upon in detail.

These few pages will be of great use to both aspiring and experienced Typhonians desiring to delve into this topic more. Nov 26, Eric Williamson rated it really liked it. This is a really entertaining and well written book that really doesn't cover a whole lot of new ground, but builds on an already firm foundation. The connection between Crowley and Lovecraft was first explored by Kenneth Grant more than 50 years ago. Lavenda relies heavily on this research. Sadly much of Grant's stuff is out of print, making this volume a nice addition to a modern occult library.

The new research involves the Necronomicon of 'Simon' which most occult scholars will say is none o This is a really entertaining and well written book that really doesn't cover a whole lot of new ground, but builds on an already firm foundation. The new research involves the Necronomicon of 'Simon' which most occult scholars will say is none other than Peter Levenda himself! The cynic could look upon this book as an ego trip as a result, and I will hardly be putting up my copy of Grant's "Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God" for auction as a result of buying it.

Still "The Dark Lord" is nicely done and was a worthwhile purchase. Feb 19, Phinehas rated it really liked it. This book was intensely interesting, however, I found its implications to be frankly terrifying.


  • Grant, Kenneth 1924-2011.
  • The Shangri-la Code (Young Heroes Book 3)!
  • peter levenda on Tumblr.
  • The Incredible Shrinking Mind: What Happens When The Human Equation Gets Lost;

May 26, Martin Popoff rated it really liked it. So cool watching Peter's mind at work A good third of this book wasn't of interest to me all the Eastern religion stuff , but it was delightful how he ties the Lovecraft and Crowley stuff together.

Shop with confidence

Plus he's just such a good explainer. Hours and hours listening to him on YouTube helps as well, in the personalizing of the experience. Jul 04, Ls Mrt rated it it was amazing. One of the best books ever written in it's genre! A true must for everybody who's interested in the non fictional background of Lovecraft's stories, Kenneth Grant and his legendary works and system, Crowley, LHP etc Mar 11, Rob Williams rated it liked it. Peter Levenda is a very good and thorough researcher, but this one kind of spent a lot of time on details that didn't seem as relevant as the kinds of things he usually digs up in research of a more political kind.

I have found other topics researched by the same author to be maybe relevant to a lot more people, but this would be more recommended for those who are specifically focused on the history of magic or the horror genre perhaps. Sep 12, Michael Kelly rated it it was amazing. A very thorough and informative account of the work and philosophy of Kenneth Grant and the Typhonian Order.

Grant can be difficult to read, his writings a stream of consciousness which only opens up to the reader after repeated visits and increasing awareness of the underlying currents and patterns.

Levenda does an excellent job of pinning down the main thrusts of the Typhonian Gnosis, making Grant accessible to a far wider readership. The book is critical where necessary, but is largely sympathe A very thorough and informative account of the work and philosophy of Kenneth Grant and the Typhonian Order. The book is critical where necessary, but is largely sympathetic. Most importantly the writer understands Grant's theories of consciousness and imagination as the key to other-dimensional reality.

It is explained not only how Grant used fiction as an influence, giving it just as much weight as historical fact and tradition, but also why it was important that he should do so. Many of the criticisms levelled at Grant's approach are revealed to be shallow when dealing with these matters. Most importantly from my perspective, the book is majestic when it comes to discussing the Dark Lord Himself, the stellar God Set, Lord of storms, foreigners, nightmares and the Other.

Levenda waxes quite eloquent in the latter pages of the book when he describes the very essence of Set and the influence of this most important of Gods upon human consciousness and that which lies beyond. There is a profound understanding of the Dark Lord evidenced here. A fascinating read, and one which may open up Grant's own writings woefully difficult thought they now are to obtain to a larger readership. Nov 19, Alex Miranda rated it really liked it. Very interesting out there stuff. I wouldn't agree with everything Levanda says about this stuff. For example he claims that Crowley's Beast or Chaos corresponds to the Egyptian god Set which I've never heard of and find hard to see.

It was a pretty fun read but I felt Levanda went off track into explanations of stuff within chapters too much losing focus of the basic ideas but then again that style might be whats needed when attempting to analyze Grants awesomely insane Typhonian Gnosis. Extra Very interesting out there stuff. Extra dimensional communications with transplutonic entities within the Mauve zone of the in between states of the qliphothic tunnels of set.

That's some Daath shit Dec 28, RB rated it really liked it. For the topics of this book, this is one of the most insightful books I have come across. It is well researched and brimming with ancients concepts, bizarre language, and even stranger connections. If you're not a skeptical reader, though, I fear there is a danger present here in that this could be read a little too seriously to the point where not so much the Satanist stuff the reader could be like one of the heroes in one of Alan Moore's comics about losing sanity while investigating Lovecra For the topics of this book, this is one of the most insightful books I have come across.

If you're not a skeptical reader, though, I fear there is a danger present here in that this could be read a little too seriously to the point where not so much the Satanist stuff the reader could be like one of the heroes in one of Alan Moore's comics about losing sanity while investigating Lovecraft's work. Apr 01, Joshua Free marked it as to-read.

Why should you use Wordery

Totally sight unseen of the books' interior, I feel the need to mention the similarity in description and tone with the "Liber-R" materials from the Mardukite Research Organization, released in as "Necronomicon Revelations" by Joshua Free. Dec 24, Kormak rated it really liked it.

Egyptian Typhonian Magick - III

Finally some in-depth, no bullshit look at the sex magick of Crowley, Grant and Tantra sects. Jun 08, Joshua rated it really liked it. This is an interesting investigation of Crowley, Grant, and Lovecraft. The magical revival by Kenneth Grant Book 14 editions published between and in 3 languages and held by 97 WorldCat member libraries worldwide.

The magical record of the Beast the diaries of Aleister Crowley, by Aleister Crowley Book 8 editions published between and in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide. Magick by Aleister Crowley Book 17 editions published between and in 3 languages and held by 85 WorldCat member libraries worldwide "Based on instruction from Liber ABA, Book 4, widely considered to be the magnum opus of 20th-century occultist Aleister Crowley. It is the chief secret of the Ancients, and if the keys have never been actually lost, they have certainly been little used.

The holders of those keys have always kept very quiet about it. This has been especially necessary in Europe, because of the dominance of persecuting churches.

Shop with confidence

Again, the confusion of thought caused by the ignorance of the people who did not understand it has discredited the whole subject. It is now our task to re-establish this science in its perfection. To that end is the aim of this book.

Listen to Peter Levenda | Talking Lovecraft now.

Cults of the shadow by Kenneth Grant Book 9 editions published between and in English and Czech and held by 66 WorldCat member libraries worldwide. Nightside of Eden by Kenneth Grant Book 7 editions published between and in English and German and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide. Outside the circles of time by Kenneth Grant Book 6 editions published between and in German and English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide.

Egyptian pharaohs as well as deities are often depicted holding an ankh, sometimes also called the crux ansata or "cross with handle. Khonsu, however, may not be as well known. It is the name of another child god, sacred to the moon. This god was usually depicted in mummified form, but with the lock of hair on the right side of his head typical of Egyptian children of ancient times. This is used to emphasize the youth of the god with the implication that he is pre-pubescent.

His mother was Mut not to be confused with Maat , a self-created mother goddess whose symbols were the vulture and the lion and whose name means "mother. Khonsu's father was Amun sometimes Amen or Amoun , the mysterious self-created god of whom Ra was often considered to be the external image, hence the composite form Amun-Ra. While Khonsu was a lunar deity, and often depicted as a child, he also had warrior tendencies in the Egyptian religion. He was believed to be a defender of the king, who destroyed his enemies by removing their internal organs and presenting them to the king for nourishment.

This odd mythologem gave rise to one epithet of Khonsu as the "king's placenta" and, indeed, he later became identified with childbirth just as Set would later be identified with miscarriage and abortion. This idea of Khonsu as the king's defender shares some ideas in common with Horus, who avenged the murder of his father, Osiris.

Often, Khonsu is depicted with a hawk's head—recalling Horus explicitly—with a lunar disk and crescent above it to identify him more carefully with the moon, as opposed to the more solar aspect of Horus. In addition, Khonsu was also depicted in a very suggestive way at his temple in Karnak: as "a ram-headed snake who fertilized the cosmic egg.

But it is the presentation of Khonsu as a child that has relevance for the Book of the Law. Khonsu is referred to in Egyptian mythology as the "Moon Child," which would become the title of one of Aleister Crowley's novels. This same image—of a child god—is found in the statues and bas-reliefs of Harpocrates, a form of Horus and, indeed, this form is mentioned in the Book of the Law several times. Crowley, as a "priest of Khonsu" deliberately makes the association with a child-god who is also a martial deity, a defender of the king.

In the case of Khonsu's father—Amun—we have the archetype of the "Hidden God" that figures so prominently in the work of Kenneth Grant and to which we will return from time to time. The first chapter of the Book of the Law consists of the words of Nuit, the goddess of the night sky, who is often depicted with her feet in the west, her hands in the east, and her body thus gracefully arched over the earth, and dotted with stars. Hadit was recruited by Thoth the Egyptian god of magic, writing, and wisdom to assist Horus in the latter's famous battle with Set.

Hadit represents a single point of light, a single star in the empyrean of Nuit. If Nuit is visualized as a circle, then Hadit would be the point in the center. In the Thelemic universe Nuit and Hadit also may represent different forms or ideas about infinity, perhaps infinite expansion and infinite contraction respectively. This is a deity composed of two different ideas: Ra and Horus. Horus is the son of Osiris and Isis and is the god who battled Set in one version of the story to avenge his father's murder. Thus, there is the implication that the identity of Horus is inextricably linked to his parentage, and that Horus's purpose as the Avenging Son thus connects him eternally with Set: a union not of love, but of war.

This "unity" of Horus with Set is an idea that Crowley embraced and which appears several times in his published work. Ra-Hoor-Khuit is mentioned frequently throughout all three chapters of the Book of the Law, and is obviously the focal point of the scripture. It is thus Horus—and especially the form of Ra-Hoor-Khuit—who will occupy most of the attention of Thelema, for he is the symbol of the New Aeon that replaces the earlier Aeon of Osiris.

However, there is a darker—more mysterious and to some an extraterrestrial—aspect to the New Aeon, and it concerns the intermediary between Crowley and the gods of the Book of the Law: the entity known variously as Aiwaz or Aiwass.