Crossroads of Twilight (Wheel of Time, Book 10)

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We begin with Perrin, dealing with the pressures of leading five separate armies that are supposed to be one, but refuse to see themselves as such. This is actually a really good beginning to the book. I really enjoy seeing how Perrin deals with rumors of infidelity, people trying to make him into something that he doesn't think he is, and holding the various factions of his army together through sheer strength of will.

This is an excellent beginning to the book. It shows his plight, and it shows how he will have to grow in order to overcome it. Internal struggle is something that Robert Jordan does very well. Yes, that's right, an entire third of the book passes without a single thing worthy of mention occurring. I've said it before, and I'll say it again. This entire storyline of Elayne getting her throne should have been glossed over rather than stretched to fill up large sections of four entire books. Because it paints a character they like as a petty, childish idiot, and because it's really not important to the overall story at all.

What little intelligence Elayne has displayed up to this point, and really she hasn't shown much, just goes straight out the window in this storyline and she basically becomes dumb as a post. It stretches on to agonizing lengths and it really doesn't need to in order to get the point across. And you know what, that she DOES get it, isn't really all that important either. I don't like her character because she's really not a character, among other reasons that I've already gone into in previous reviews of other books in this series.

She's an heir to the throne. Take that away and she's absolutely nothing. She has no identity or personality as a character other than that. Her losing her only source of identity, as she should have by any and all rights after everything that's happened, and dealing with it would have been far more interesting than this load of crap. Oh, and another thing that annoys me about her is how every other word out of her is whining about it being Rand's fault she's pregnant.

Uh, no, it isn't. That's, frankly, just plain irresponsible and childish. I'm sorry if my saying so offends any ladies out there, but it is. I'm sorry that pregnancy sucks, but, I mean, come on, she's the one that tripped him into her bed. By his own logic, which he used to explain important characters being left out of earlier volumes, this makes absolutely no sense at all. This is something that is not interesting at all, something that even fans of Elayne don't want to read about, and does little but take up massive amounts of space in a series that really doesn't need any extra filler to little point or purpose.

I don't get it WHY is so much of the latter third of this series filled with a storyline that is almost completely pointless and serves little purpose to the overall plot of the series? I'll tell you why. Because in this book, Robert Jordan sold out. He stopped telling a story, and he started stretching so he could get at least one extra novel out of the story and milk his fans for another thirty bucks each with this piece of crap. After that mind-numbing complete waste of three hundred pages, we shift to Egwene dealing with Aes Sedai politics.

If you enjoy Egwene, and the way she has to keep on her toes to hold the rebel Aes Sedai together, and keep them aimed at their goal, you may enjoy this section of the book. Me, I felt it was unnecessary. We already know what she's dealing with as Amyrlin Seat. We don't need a reiteration of things that have already been established, especially when, like with Elayne's section, very little of overall importance takes place during this section.

This is basically just copy and paste from any chapter of your choice about Egwene from the previous four books. There are no new revelations given, and nothing happens to advance the plot. There is some foreshadowing given for the end of the book, but at this point, I don't think many people really cared. That event was not really important enough to deserve the foreshadowing in my opinion. We shift back to Perrin in one of the most haunting and tone rich chapters of the entire series where he goes to buy grain in a haunted city.

Robert Jordan has always been excellent in giving a good mood and tone for any given scene, and making you, as the reader, FEEL what's going on. Here he's outdone himself. This is probably one of my favorite chapters in the entire series. Ironic, that. Jordan paints a picture of a dark and downtrodden city living in fear of their own dead and it's really spectacularly done.

And then we get people around Rand doing nothing, and Rand making plans that really should have been left for the next book for all that's accomplished here in including it. Rand just cleansed freaking Sai'din. Something no one has been able to do for three thousand years. He's put an end to male channelers going mad simply for being what they are. This is probably the most momentous thing that has happened in the entire series thus far, and he doesn't even bother to acknowledge that it even happened.

We don't get any of his thoughts or feelings on the matter at all. The entire event is treated as though it's of no import at all, and Rand, as a character has not grown in the slightest over it. Or at least he appears not to have. Most of this section is not even told from his point of view, and he's more of a side attraction to the things other people are doing.

I want to know what he's feeling, what he's thinking, what's going through his heart and mind after accomplishing something so incredible. And he can't even be bothered to have a single thought about how god-like it made him feel to channel that much of the power? This portion of the book was wasted on other characters basically doing nothing, and Aes Sedai gossiping about their Warders.

Not exactly engaging dialog, or important to the plot. Then the book shifts over to Mat, slooooooowly escaping Ebou Dar. As I've said before, this section of the story has basically just been stretched out to remind us that Mat still exists in this book. His storyline for this book and the previous one really should have been condensed into a single chapter or two. It's like RJ got to this point of the novel and realized it was running short and tossed in a few chapters of Mat being Mat to lengthen it a bit.

Not much goes on here except that he starts courting Tuon, whom he is destined to marry, and as he does plenty of that in the next book, his section in this one is completely pointless and really feels sort of tacked on. And then we finish up with Egwene doing more nothing for a couple chapters before the big, epic Wheel of Time clima--oh right, this book doesn't have one.

Every single book up to this point has had a hugely epic, over the top climax that has wowed me in almost every way. Every book until now has had a huge, epic throwdown, and has left me with a sense that something important to the story has happened. Something has been accomplished. Something has happened.

The story has moved forward. But not here. OH NO. Even in earlier books where not much happened, they still ended with a huge climactic ending that left me with a sense of something having been accomplished. Yes, book eight might have been a little weaker than the others, but it still moved the story forward.

Here, what do we get? We get a cliffhanger, and an extraordinarily weak one at that. It's handled with all of the fanfare and excitement as someone pouring salt on their meal. Egwene is captured. The End. It's like a slap in the face after the knee to the junk that this book embodied. I don't know about you, but when a book ends without some sort of climactic event, I feel as though I've been cheated. If there's no payoff at the ending, why am I even reading?

The journey may be the most important part, but if it's not leading anywhere, what's the point in even reading the damn book? He couldn't have tossed something superficially flashy in as a reward for slogging through this soulless, vacuous excuse for a Wheel of Time book? Nope, apparently not. The book ends so abruptly that it was rumored for years on the internet that the publisher gave RJ a hard deadline and told him that if he wasn't done by then, the book would be published as it was, whether it was done or not.

So, as the rumor went, the book was published without its ending. I'm almost inclined to believe it, if I didn't know for a fact that wasn't the way that RJ used to write. He didn't write linearly. Thanks RJ. The good? This book is not completely without merit. The parts of the book about Perrin are excellent. Not much really happens in them, but Perrin grows tremendously as a character during this book. Plus you get that couple of chapters in the haunted city that are really a perfect example to anyone wishing to learn how to write on how to manipulate tone and setting to spectacular effect.

The bad? Almost nothing in this book serves any purpose to the plot. The only character in it that actually develops is Perrin. There are plenty of things that, if you know where to look, point to things that happen in the next book. Nothing happens here that is really worth the time to read. When I reread this book I typically skip through almost half of it because it's so superfluous that it really serves no purpose at all except to take up space. The ugly? I basically already ranted about everything I wanted to rant about in the summary. This book isn't about telling a good story, continuing the legend, or progressing the characters.

It's about one thing alone. Dollar signs. There really are no words to describe what a betrayal to all of RJ's fans that this book was. This was the book where I could no longer delude myself into thinking that he was stretching things out toward any sort of purpose. This was the book where I knew for a fact that this story was being stretched only for the purpose of bringing in more money, and it really shows. When maybe five chapters of the forty or so in the book actually serve any purpose to story or character development and the rest is just filler that doesn't even end in a climax of any kind, I can't make any excuses for the author anymore.

For someone that has been with this series through thick and thin from the very beginning I felt that this book was just insulting to me. I can't tell you how many hundreds of dollars I've spent on rebuying copies of these books because I've worn them out, and when I got to this one, it felt as though it was all for nothing. It felt as though the author that I adored, whose fancy car and gigantic house I helped to buy, had no respect for me whatsoever.

It was as if he just squatted down and took a gigantic crap all over his entire fanbase with this book. And that is why I hate it. Because this book isn't about really anything except an author betraying his fans and stretching a story out pointlessly to make an extra buck. All sense of anything magical has been stripped away from the story at this point, and the ENTIRE book focuses on politics that really don't need any more focus than they've already been given. This is what you get when you strip all of the action, the magic, and the heart from a work of fantasy fiction.

A boring, soulless waste of space. This book gets one star becasue I like Perrin's storyline here. That's ALL that this book has going for it. If you are a completist and wish to read the entire series as a whole, sure, but be warned that you're in for a long and boring read. Anyone else, large sections of this book can be skipped over without missing a thing of importance. I actually recommend for most casual readers to skip this book entirely and check out the Crossroads of Twilight Wiki Page and read the plot summary.

It tells you everything that you need to know in a scant eleven lines of text. This book was more about an author seeing dollar signs rather than telling a story. It wasn't enjoyable, it was rather insulting, and I treat it as such.


  • Crossroads of Twilight (Wheel of Time, #10) by Robert Jordan;
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  • Crossroads of Twilight: Book Ten of 'the Wheel of Time': 10/12?
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It really is an awful book and illustrates basically every single criticism that people have for the series without giving anything at all that can be used in its defense. It's a bloated and generally pointless piece of trash in an otherwise extraordinary series. Check out my other reviews.

Crossroads of Twilight is an ugly duckling in The Wheel of Time. Parts of the book are chronologically set in the same time span as the previous book and other parts are set in the 'current' time after the ninth book. Adding to the unorthodox chronological timing of this book is the fact that, of all the books in this series, this book is a 'filler' book.

That is not to say that nothing worth noting happens in this book. What keeps me reading these books however is the characterisation, the magic and the general world-building. As I've mentioned several times Robert Jordan was never the greatest word-smith. His turn of phrase is at times clumsy in his books and his word choice under deep examination would perhaps prove quite flawed.

However in my eyes the flaws humanise these novels and serve to remove that element of pomposity I sense in other fantasy epics. I'm not saying that at times Jordan doesn't lose track of how big his world is, but I don't sense that in his writing he is suggesting that the reader look at how amazing he is and how good he is. Something that I have sensed in the popular A Game of Thrones. I'm saying that Robert Jordan, while he was alive, was likely a down to earth individual simply judging from his easy going style with writing and that is something that appeals to me, ridiculous as that may sound.

One of the major themes of The Wheel of Time is birth, death and rebirth. In many ways, while this is a popularised fantasy epic it also has ideas within it about life, ideas which are important to our reality.

Fiction at the intersection of adventure, science, faith and philosophy

That said, this is at its heart, still designed to be a story rather than a lesson in how we are to live. So I can't recommend that you go into these novels expecting anything other than a fascinating story. I feel that I simply happen to see more in the novels than is presented to the casual reader. And yet I make sure that I never read so far into the books that everything becomes a metaphor for some real world event.

To go back to the topic of birth, death and rebirth, I find that in this series the characters particularly represent rebirth.

However the other way that rebirth is shown is a symbolic rebirth with characters being transformed from regular farmherds into magic wielding heroes. And, unlike most other books which take this 'heroes' journey' route, the series generally has decent character progression with the exception of one or two exceptions. As said in other reviews I recommend the series with the warning that some of the books are a slow drag compared to others.

This is one of the slow dragging novels, and one of the last, with the next book speeding up and featuring many important plot points. View all 3 comments. Normally in my WOT reviews I list things that actually happened things of significance in these books so as to illustrate how much space was taken up by non-essential real estate. Quite literally, as of this book, Jordan lost the plot entirely.

And my copy has pages of text, not including the glossary and maps. There is infinitesimal movement on all fronts. Mostly the characters just sit Normally in my WOT reviews I list things that actually happened things of significance in these books so as to illustrate how much space was taken up by non-essential real estate. Mostly the characters just sit around talking about stuff that has happened, and stuff they think is going to happen.

The most significant thing that happens this book is that Jordan makes sure to have each storyline at one point react to Rand cleansing the taint from Saidin, which is not even something that happened in this book. So, the most exciting thing to be found here is characters reacting to something that happened in another book. There is no indication at all that Jordan has tried to adhere to having conflict, rising tension, a climax or a resolution, as most people would agree are the things that make up a story.

This is an page status update. The only two things that held my attention were Cadsuane, and Mat and Tuon. And Mat and Tuon because I was eager to see what the dynamic between the two of them would be. Spoiler: they were prophesied to marry each other, both of them know about this, but neither knows the other knows. This is a great set-up for a romance!

Unfortunately, Jordan mostly wastes that opportunity, in my opinion. Their relationship dynamic seems to be yet another in a seemingly endless line of men and women in these books who court each other by being as antagonistic as possible. There were glimmers of something interesting a couple of times. First, when Tuon sees how distraught Mat is at learning Tylin has died, there was something like a genuine human connection. And then again. View all 5 comments. Legend fades to myth and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

I am on book ten I feel emotional as I know I am nearly finished this series. I have got five books left to complete 'The Wheel of Time'. I really enjoyed Winter's Heart. I personally think book could have delivered better storylines or they "The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. I personally think book could have delivered better storylines or they could be in one book. This book is really slow and it can be furious but I have to be patient and read it. Some readers think Jordan has lost controlled on book of 'The Wheel of Time' however I don't think Jordan has lost controlled as I still think and always think that Robert Jordan is one of an extraordinary authors.

I think Jordan intends to develop storylines from book There is some interesting development in the book such as the characters development. Sep 06, Ryan rated it it was ok. I consider myself a patient reader when it comes to "The Wheel of Time," but even I have trouble excusing Crossroads of Twilight , Book To be honest, although I recently read Crossroads of Twilight , I can't remember what happens. I actually found a summary on Wikipedia. In short, not only is nothing resolved, but nothing happens. The best that can be said in defense of I consider myself a patient reader when it comes to "The Wheel of Time," but even I have trouble excusing Crossroads of Twilight , Book The best that can be said in defense of Crossroads of Twilight is that Mat returns after a two novels long absence.

I'm usually a fan of Mat's story. However, if I recall correctly, the climax of Mat's storyline is when a woman disappears, only to reappear shortly thereafter. I may be wrong, but I believe she was looking at dresses At this point, Perrin is completely lost. I don't mean that he's "sold his soul" to recover his abducted wife, as the dust jacket's summary ominously suggests. I mean that Jordan seems to have completely lost track of whatever Perrin was supposed to be doing to help Rand win The Last Battle. Egwene, Jordan's most admirable Aes Sedai, is stuck as well.

And Rand? Well, it worked in The Dragon Reborn. I remember reading that even Jordan once said this was his weakest work. He was right. Please be mindful of this in the comments, both for me and for others who may or may not have progressed past this point in the series. Thank you. It's been years since I last read it, so I let all the negative hype get to me, and I started dreading my re Reviewed by: Rabid Reads NOTICE: this reread is in preparation for finally biting the bullet and reading book It's been years since I last read it, so I let all the negative hype get to me, and I started dreading my revisit, but it wasn't half as bad as people made it out to be.

I think the main problem is that for more than half of the book, we're reliving how the previous installment ended from numerous alternate POVs. So we spend five times as long on a less exciting version of events. The fact that we've already experienced this time period is unrelated to all the new things. New things that are important to the End Game, and if you focus on the new material, rather than the lack of forward motion in the timeline, it's still a good installment.

Noal Charin--who is he really? We meet this old guy in WoT 9, and if you're like me, you were quickly smitten with his tales of grand adventures past. Is Noel really the famous traveler, originally from Malkier? I don't know, but I'm hopeful. That smarmy Captain in Elayne's guard. Gets the set down of his life, from the usually useless Elayne no less, and the varying reactions of three Aes Sedai in question give us our first solid lead on the identity of the Black Sister. Egwene figures out how to make cuendillar. Which may not sound like a big deal, but it is. Trust me. Egwene's got a plan.

Aes Sedai are bonding Asha'men all over the place.

Crossroads of Twilight (Wheel of Time, Book 10)

If for no other reason than the Warder bond doesn't work the same way on men who can channel as it does on men who can't. Halima disappears long enough for Egwene to get her Dream on. And not only does she have a second Dream that suggests Mat will be successful in his endeavor to blow shit up, but she has a dream about a Seanchan woman with a sword and a shifting face who will help her. No specifics on how this mystery woman will help Egwene yet, but I'm hopeful that the shifting face means that she's another Hero attached to the Wheel, spun back into world for Tarmon Gai'don.

The Dark One made flesh. Hollow, it seemed to boom down caverns from some unimaginable distance. The creature grew as it spoke, swelling in size till its head brushed the ceiling, over two spans up. My hand reaches far, Mesaana. It's left at insinuation, but still. All the Big Deal stuff I need to spoiler tag. Rand calls a truce with the Seanchan. Egwene gets captured by Elaida's faction. And once again, I heartily recommend this series. Sep 30, Mike the Paladin rated it did not like it Shelves: fantasy. Robert Jordan died on September 16, , after a courageous battle with the rare blood disease amyloidosis.

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Description Product Details Click on the cover image above to read some pages of this book! If there's no payoff at the ending, why am I even reading? The journey may be the most important part, but if it's not leading anywhere, what's the point in even reading the damn book? He couldn't have tossed something superficially flashy in as a reward for slogging through this soulless, vacuous excuse for a Wheel of Time book?

Nope, apparently not. The book ends so abruptly that it was rumored for years on the internet that the publisher gave RJ a hard deadline and told him that if he wasn't done by then, the book would be published as it was, whether it was done or not. So, as the rumor went, the book was published without its ending.

I'm almost inclined to believe it, if I didn't know for a fact that wasn't the way that RJ used to write. He didn't write linearly. Thanks RJ. The good? This book is not completely without merit.

Crossroads Of Twilight

The parts of the book about Perrin are excellent. Not much really happens in them, but Perrin grows tremendously as a character during this book. Plus you get that couple of chapters in the haunted city that are really a perfect example to anyone wishing to learn how to write on how to manipulate tone and setting to spectacular effect.

The bad? Almost nothing in this book serves any purpose to the plot. The only character in it that actually develops is Perrin. There are plenty of things that, if you know where to look, point to things that happen in the next book. Nothing happens here that is really worth the time to read. When I reread this book I typically skip through almost half of it because it's so superfluous that it really serves no purpose at all except to take up space. The ugly? I basically already ranted about everything I wanted to rant about in the summary.

This book isn't about telling a good story, continuing the legend, or progressing the characters. It's about one thing alone. Dollar signs. There really are no words to describe what a betrayal to all of RJ's fans that this book was. This was the book where I could no longer delude myself into thinking that he was stretching things out toward any sort of purpose. This was the book where I knew for a fact that this story was being stretched only for the purpose of bringing in more money, and it really shows.

When maybe five chapters of the forty or so in the book actually serve any purpose to story or character development and the rest is just filler that doesn't even end in a climax of any kind, I can't make any excuses for the author anymore. For someone that has been with this series through thick and thin from the very beginning I felt that this book was just insulting to me. I can't tell you how many hundreds of dollars I've spent on rebuying copies of these books because I've worn them out, and when I got to this one, it felt as though it was all for nothing.

It felt as though the author that I adored, whose fancy car and gigantic house I helped to buy, had no respect for me whatsoever. It was as if he just squatted down and took a gigantic crap all over his entire fanbase with this book. And that is why I hate it. Because this book isn't about really anything except an author betraying his fans and stretching a story out pointlessly to make an extra buck. All sense of anything magical has been stripped away from the story at this point, and the ENTIRE book focuses on politics that really don't need any more focus than they've already been given.

This is what you get when you strip all of the action, the magic, and the heart from a work of fantasy fiction. A boring, soulless waste of space. This book gets one star becasue I like Perrin's storyline here. That's ALL that this book has going for it. If you are a completist and wish to read the entire series as a whole, sure, but be warned that you're in for a long and boring read.

Anyone else, large sections of this book can be skipped over without missing a thing of importance. I actually recommend for most casual readers to skip this book entirely and check out the Crossroads of Twilight Wiki Page and read the plot summary. It tells you everything that you need to know in a scant eleven lines of text. This book was more about an author seeing dollar signs rather than telling a story.

It wasn't enjoyable, it was rather insulting, and I treat it as such. It really is an awful book and illustrates basically every single criticism that people have for the series without giving anything at all that can be used in its defense. It's a bloated and generally pointless piece of trash in an otherwise extraordinary series. Check out my other reviews. Crossroads of Twilight is an ugly duckling in The Wheel of Time.

Parts of the book are chronologically set in the same time span as the previous book and other parts are set in the 'current' time after the ninth book. Adding to the unorthodox chronological timing of this book is the fact that, of all the books in this series, this book is a 'filler' book. That is not to say that nothing worth noting happens in this book. What keeps me reading these books however is the characterisation, the magic and the general world-building. As I've mentioned several times Robert Jordan was never the greatest word-smith.

Wotalong Liveshow Announcement: Book 10, The Crossroads of Twilight

His turn of phrase is at times clumsy in his books and his word choice under deep examination would perhaps prove quite flawed. However in my eyes the flaws humanise these novels and serve to remove that element of pomposity I sense in other fantasy epics. I'm not saying that at times Jordan doesn't lose track of how big his world is, but I don't sense that in his writing he is suggesting that the reader look at how amazing he is and how good he is.

Something that I have sensed in the popular A Game of Thrones. I'm saying that Robert Jordan, while he was alive, was likely a down to earth individual simply judging from his easy going style with writing and that is something that appeals to me, ridiculous as that may sound. One of the major themes of The Wheel of Time is birth, death and rebirth. In many ways, while this is a popularised fantasy epic it also has ideas within it about life, ideas which are important to our reality. That said, this is at its heart, still designed to be a story rather than a lesson in how we are to live.

So I can't recommend that you go into these novels expecting anything other than a fascinating story. I feel that I simply happen to see more in the novels than is presented to the casual reader. And yet I make sure that I never read so far into the books that everything becomes a metaphor for some real world event. To go back to the topic of birth, death and rebirth, I find that in this series the characters particularly represent rebirth. However the other way that rebirth is shown is a symbolic rebirth with characters being transformed from regular farmherds into magic wielding heroes.

And, unlike most other books which take this 'heroes' journey' route, the series generally has decent character progression with the exception of one or two exceptions. As said in other reviews I recommend the series with the warning that some of the books are a slow drag compared to others. This is one of the slow dragging novels, and one of the last, with the next book speeding up and featuring many important plot points. View all 3 comments. Normally in my WOT reviews I list things that actually happened things of significance in these books so as to illustrate how much space was taken up by non-essential real estate.

Quite literally, as of this book, Jordan lost the plot entirely. And my copy has pages of text, not including the glossary and maps. There is infinitesimal movement on all fronts. Mostly the characters just sit Normally in my WOT reviews I list things that actually happened things of significance in these books so as to illustrate how much space was taken up by non-essential real estate.

Mostly the characters just sit around talking about stuff that has happened, and stuff they think is going to happen. The most significant thing that happens this book is that Jordan makes sure to have each storyline at one point react to Rand cleansing the taint from Saidin, which is not even something that happened in this book. So, the most exciting thing to be found here is characters reacting to something that happened in another book. There is no indication at all that Jordan has tried to adhere to having conflict, rising tension, a climax or a resolution, as most people would agree are the things that make up a story.

This is an page status update. The only two things that held my attention were Cadsuane, and Mat and Tuon. And Mat and Tuon because I was eager to see what the dynamic between the two of them would be. Spoiler: they were prophesied to marry each other, both of them know about this, but neither knows the other knows. This is a great set-up for a romance! Unfortunately, Jordan mostly wastes that opportunity, in my opinion. Their relationship dynamic seems to be yet another in a seemingly endless line of men and women in these books who court each other by being as antagonistic as possible.

There were glimmers of something interesting a couple of times. First, when Tuon sees how distraught Mat is at learning Tylin has died, there was something like a genuine human connection. And then again. View all 5 comments. Legend fades to myth and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

I am on book ten I feel emotional as I know I am nearly finished this series. I have got five books left to complete 'The Wheel of Time'. I really enjoyed Winter's Heart. I personally think book could have delivered better storylines or they "The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend.

I personally think book could have delivered better storylines or they could be in one book. This book is really slow and it can be furious but I have to be patient and read it. Some readers think Jordan has lost controlled on book of 'The Wheel of Time' however I don't think Jordan has lost controlled as I still think and always think that Robert Jordan is one of an extraordinary authors. I think Jordan intends to develop storylines from book There is some interesting development in the book such as the characters development.

Sep 06, Ryan rated it it was ok. I consider myself a patient reader when it comes to "The Wheel of Time," but even I have trouble excusing Crossroads of Twilight , Book To be honest, although I recently read Crossroads of Twilight , I can't remember what happens. I actually found a summary on Wikipedia. In short, not only is nothing resolved, but nothing happens.

Crossroads of Twilight | Brandon Sanderson

The best that can be said in defense of I consider myself a patient reader when it comes to "The Wheel of Time," but even I have trouble excusing Crossroads of Twilight , Book The best that can be said in defense of Crossroads of Twilight is that Mat returns after a two novels long absence. I'm usually a fan of Mat's story. However, if I recall correctly, the climax of Mat's storyline is when a woman disappears, only to reappear shortly thereafter.

I may be wrong, but I believe she was looking at dresses At this point, Perrin is completely lost. I don't mean that he's "sold his soul" to recover his abducted wife, as the dust jacket's summary ominously suggests. I mean that Jordan seems to have completely lost track of whatever Perrin was supposed to be doing to help Rand win The Last Battle. Egwene, Jordan's most admirable Aes Sedai, is stuck as well.

And Rand? Well, it worked in The Dragon Reborn. I remember reading that even Jordan once said this was his weakest work. He was right. Please be mindful of this in the comments, both for me and for others who may or may not have progressed past this point in the series.

Thank you. It's been years since I last read it, so I let all the negative hype get to me, and I started dreading my re Reviewed by: Rabid Reads NOTICE: this reread is in preparation for finally biting the bullet and reading book It's been years since I last read it, so I let all the negative hype get to me, and I started dreading my revisit, but it wasn't half as bad as people made it out to be.

I think the main problem is that for more than half of the book, we're reliving how the previous installment ended from numerous alternate POVs. So we spend five times as long on a less exciting version of events. The fact that we've already experienced this time period is unrelated to all the new things. New things that are important to the End Game, and if you focus on the new material, rather than the lack of forward motion in the timeline, it's still a good installment. Noal Charin--who is he really? We meet this old guy in WoT 9, and if you're like me, you were quickly smitten with his tales of grand adventures past.

Is Noel really the famous traveler, originally from Malkier? I don't know, but I'm hopeful. That smarmy Captain in Elayne's guard. Gets the set down of his life, from the usually useless Elayne no less, and the varying reactions of three Aes Sedai in question give us our first solid lead on the identity of the Black Sister.

Egwene figures out how to make cuendillar. Which may not sound like a big deal, but it is. Trust me.

Egwene's got a plan. Aes Sedai are bonding Asha'men all over the place. If for no other reason than the Warder bond doesn't work the same way on men who can channel as it does on men who can't. Halima disappears long enough for Egwene to get her Dream on. And not only does she have a second Dream that suggests Mat will be successful in his endeavor to blow shit up, but she has a dream about a Seanchan woman with a sword and a shifting face who will help her.

No specifics on how this mystery woman will help Egwene yet, but I'm hopeful that the shifting face means that she's another Hero attached to the Wheel, spun back into world for Tarmon Gai'don. The Dark One made flesh. Hollow, it seemed to boom down caverns from some unimaginable distance. The creature grew as it spoke, swelling in size till its head brushed the ceiling, over two spans up.

My hand reaches far, Mesaana. It's left at insinuation, but still. All the Big Deal stuff I need to spoiler tag. Rand calls a truce with the Seanchan. Egwene gets captured by Elaida's faction. And once again, I heartily recommend this series. Sep 30, Mike the Paladin rated it did not like it Shelves: fantasy.

A huge amount of this huge book take place simultaneously with Winter's Heart. The key words in this volume are "trying" and "continuing" as everyone continues "trying" something or is "continuing" with something that never seems to get tied up. We do get a slight move in one plot point At this point I could have cried. Instead it turned into a slow moving, repetitive, money machine as each volume was going to the top of the best seller lists.

Although the sales of this series have steadily dropped since the 7th volume. I don't know how they will do as a new writer sets out to complete the story. The story lumbers on. Some like the Sanderson books better but to me the convoluted plot line has been so stretched out that it can never be what it might have been. Nov 11, Kyle rated it liked it. The Wheel of Time series represents, for me, the perfect example of a guilty pleasure in the world of fantasy. This series is not actually written very well. Robert Jordan was not a very good wordsmith, and he really only knew how to say and describe things one way.

His characters are generally unbelievable, and have ridiculous dialogue. The plot is tremendously predictable, and is heavily influenced close to the point of being unoriginal by the fantasy works that came before. The whole story i The Wheel of Time series represents, for me, the perfect example of a guilty pleasure in the world of fantasy. The whole story is much, much longer than it needs to be and obviously became bigger than Jordan could handle. That being said I still enjoy these books. I can't rationally explain it, and I've re-read most of them at least a couple times.

I shouldn't be so attached to them, yet I'm chained by my own embarrassed desire to periodically dive into the wheel of time. The only explanation I can think of, is that Jordan was a wizard. Not a skillful, subtle, thoughtful wizard; a sneaky, dark, and soul-sucking wizard who has enchanted me by his mediocre writing. Many people despise and look down their nose at these books, and I totally understand that.

Many people also love and adore these books, and will forever place The Wheel of Time series upon their list of all-time favorite books. I can understand that impulse too. I realize this review is lacking in helpfulness, but the important thing to take away is this: try these books out. If you hate them, then fine. At least you'll have given them a chance. If you Love them, then great!

Good for you, and you have a long, LONG, journey ahead of you filled with something you love. Either way, you'll have exposed yourself to one of the most famous fantasy series of all time. Honestly, I can't. I can't I can't I can't. Do you know how to tell when you are seriously being f'd up? That was me. I'm so sad because I started this series, just thinking, just thinking that it might become my favorite series of all time. Somehow, I still believe that.

I n Honestly, I can't. I need a break. View all 6 comments. This was one of the WoT entries that I found the least enjoyable of the bunch so much politics - shudders , but it was still good. Mat carried this one for me as his moments with Tuon were some of the best in the series and I am definitely looking forward to the last few books. It can only pick up from here. Feb 07, YouKneeK rated it it was amazing Shelves: fantasy , completed-series. Crossroads of Twilight is the tenth book in The Wheel of Time. Many, but not all, of the smaller subplots moved forward a tiny bit also.

Everything did move forward a little bit, though, and I was never bored. For me, this was just a few more interesting pages in one really long and really interesting story and therefore no less enjoyable than the earlier pages. I have a few more spoiler-ish comments in the tags: view spoiler [That was quite a cliff hanger at the end, with Egwene apparently captured by people in the white tower, who knows which faction, and apparently being forced to drink that lovely forkroot tea.

Even seemingly-innocent scenes involving tea have me on edge. I'm not having that problem with the others. Jul 19, Phrynne rated it liked it. Basically the whole book was about very little but I am so invested in these characters now that I enjoyed it anyway. You have to admire Jordan's skill. In seven hundred pages we never find out if Rand cleansed the source or not at the end of the previous book. That's how you make a story last through multiple huge volumes.

Excited to move on to the next one of those volumes right now! View all 9 comments. The tenth part of the series and we've gotten for good into the final straight. I dare to say that the last 5 parts could have been a single book, which is why we have to judge this as part of a whole. It is certainly the least interesting book of the series as do not happen many things, with the writer simply developing the various threads of the plot without reaching any point at any climax, except perhaps in the end.

As part of a whole, however, it is definitely interesting, and anyone who ha The tenth part of the series and we've gotten for good into the final straight. As part of a whole, however, it is definitely interesting, and anyone who has reached the end of the series understands how necessary it is as it prepares us for everything that awaits us thereafter. Perhaps the author might have put in this book some of the intense scenes that exist in the next to have a balance but I think he finally made the right choice. In this tenth book of the series, things are still getting worse, with the dark forces moving the strings in the background, raising the difficulties our heroes have to face.

Nevertheless, in many cases, hope appears on the horizon, although it seems that unconventional thought and breaking of stereotypes is needed to materialize. This, however, requires conflicts with those who do not like changes and intelligent manipulations so that maximum consensus can finally be reached. All this in a book that certainly does not excite the reader with its evolution, but it has the depth that is needed, with the absence of action giving the author the opportunity to deal more with characters, their relationships and intricate power games.

At the same time, the story goes as much as we need to get to a point just before the strident developments that come to the next book. Mar 25, David rated it it was ok Shelves: fantasy. Ok, bad news first. The first two-thirds of this book are completely superfluous.

Prepare yourself for lots of passive-aggressive insults and dre So Prepare yourself for lots of passive-aggressive insults and dress-smoothing. I won't say what it is here, because spoilers, but it is monumental. It changes the direction of the plot and the fates of many characters entirely. Instead of continuing with this very interesting development, however, Jordan barely mentions it here.

Their storylines are not interesting and pretty poorly written. Rand barely appears.